Foresters Insurance Challenges North Americans to Take Daily ‘Tech Timeout’

Forester's Tech Timeout Challenge

In a new year-long campaign launched February 5 ‘Tech Timeout‘, Life Insurance provider Foresters is challenging families (and I assume couples and individuals) to take a scheduled break from all electronic devices and spend time reconnecting with each other in more meaningful ways.

The campaign ad features people completely oblivious to other people and their surroundings, while distracted by their tech devices. The clips shows a man entering the wrong house, a girl runs into a light pole while texting, a wife pours steaming coffee into her husband’s lap, and a group of tennis players are oblivious to the game they are supposed to be playing.

The situations while outrageous, aren’t far from the truth. It’s behaviour that most of are either guilty of ourselves, or that we observe everyday.

In a press release to announce the campaign, George Mohacsi, Foresters’ President and CEO said, “Foresters purpose is to champion family well-being and we do that through quality life insurance, unique member benefits and inspiring community activities. We are always looking for innovative ways to help families spend time together and challenging them to ‘disconnect to reconnect’ is a simple way to turn our purpose into action.”

A recent Consumer Electronics Association study reported that the average US home has 24 different consumer media and communication devices, including multiple televisions, computers and smartphones and some believe the proliferation of these devices contributes to a sense of social isolation even when you’re in the same room with other people.

According to the Center for Digital Future, in 2008, 28 percent of people said that being wired has resulted in them spending less time with family members, a significant increase from the 11 percent reported in 2006.

In my opinion it’s like everything else, it’s about balance, and being aware that while technology can enable us to connect with like-minded people, friends and family on the other side of the world, it should not isolate ourselves from our relationships in the real world.

Whether you participate in Foresters’ challenge, do you think you could take a daily break from all technology devices?

USACanada

Samsung UK Recruits 250 David Baileys to Promote NX Smart Camera

Samsung - David BaileySamsung is promoting that their NX smart cameras can turn anyone into a great photographer, maybe even as good as famed UK-photographer David Bailey.

To find out, Samsung are recruiting 250 people in the UK with the name David Bailey. They’ll be supplied with a Samsung NX smart camera, weekly assignments and special personal training from “the” David Bailey. The amateur David Baileys will capture photographs of their daily life to be used in the second phase of the campaign.

A few of the David Baileys have already begun posting examples of their photography.

The campaign was created by Cheil UK.

[via brand-e.biz]

UK

Tweet a Treat to Bill the Interactive Jubilee Corgi

Bill the Interactive CorgiIt’s well-known that Queen Elizabeth is a dog-lover, and her longtime breed of choice is of of course the corgi. The Queen’s father King George VI first introduced the corgi breed to the royal family in 1933, and (according to the family pets page of the official Monarchy website) today she owns three Corgis: Monty, Willow and Holly and three Dorgis (a Dachshund-Corgis mix): Candy, Cider and Vulcan.

To celebrate the Queen’s Jubilee visual effects company The Mill have created Bill the interactive corgi. They’ve created a temporary home for Bill on a digital screen installed in their windows at 40-41 Great Marlborough Street, London (if you happen to be in the neighbourhood).

You can send a ‘tweet-treat’ to Bill between May 28 and June 5 using the @themillcorgi profile and the hashtags #play #eat #chill or #party.

For every tweet sent, the Mill will donate 50p to the Battersea Dogs Home Trust (the Queen is a patron of the organization)

UK

Swedish Armed Forces Thinks Literally 'Inside the Box' For Recruitment Experiment

Swedish Armed Forces - Who Cares?On social media, users have commonly expressed their support for or against causes through shares, tweets and status updates. The term Slactivism has been used to brand these low-involvement activities, and as you would expect, there is much debate on whether creating awareness through social media via status updates truly benefits the cause.

With this is mind, the Swedish Armed Forces was wondering how they could attract young people to an occupation where they would have to give up their real comforts in order to help other people. They staged a scenario to determine how far people were willing to go for one another. A volunteer was placed inside a locked box in central Stockholm, they would have to stay in the box until someone willingly replaced him. Each hour a door would open; if someone was at the door the person could leave, if not they had to stay there for however long it took for someone to arrive to replace them.

A camera inside the box streamed live video of the volunteer to a live banner on YouTube, the Swedish Armed Forces website and on digital signage in the area. During the 89 hours of the experiment, 70 people stepped forward to free someone that they had never met.

The campaign was widely discussed on social media and the website drew over 100,000 visitors in 4 days. The goal of getting 4300 applications for 1430 positions was surpassed when they received 93000 applications, more than double their original goal.

The campaign was created by DDB Stockholm.

Sweden

Swedish Armed Forces Thinks Literally ‘Inside the Box’ For Recruitment Experiment

Swedish Armed Forces - Who Cares?On social media, users have commonly expressed their support for or against causes through shares, tweets and status updates. The term Slactivism has been used to brand these low-involvement activities, and as you would expect, there is much debate on whether creating awareness through social media via status updates truly benefits the cause.

With this is mind, the Swedish Armed Forces was wondering how they could attract young people to an occupation where they would have to give up their real comforts in order to help other people. They staged a scenario to determine how far people were willing to go for one another. A volunteer was placed inside a locked box in central Stockholm, they would have to stay in the box until someone willingly replaced him. Each hour a door would open; if someone was at the door the person could leave, if not they had to stay there for however long it took for someone to arrive to replace them.

A camera inside the box streamed live video of the volunteer to a live banner on YouTube, the Swedish Armed Forces website and on digital signage in the area. During the 89 hours of the experiment, 70 people stepped forward to free someone that they had never met.

The campaign was widely discussed on social media and the website drew over 100,000 visitors in 4 days. The goal of getting 4300 applications for 1430 positions was surpassed when they received 93000 applications, more than double their original goal.

The campaign was created by DDB Stockholm.

Sweden